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podcast audio series
Reconsidering Insomnia as a Disorder Rather Than Just a Symptom in Psychiatric Practice

Supported by an educational grant from Merck & Co., Inc.

Assessing and Treating Insomnia in Patients With Psychiatric Disorders, Part 1

0.5 Credit

View the CME Background Information

View the References

Take the Posttest and Evaluation

Download the MP3

Assessing and Treating Insomnia in Patients With Psychiatric Disorders, Part 2

0.5 Credit

View the CME Background Information

View the References

Take the Posttest and Evaluation

Download the MP3

View Podcast in iTunes

Reconsidering Insomnia as a Disorder Rather Than Just a Symptom in Psychiatric Practice

1.0 Credit

View the CME Activity

Take the Posttest and Evaluation

Financial Disclosure

The faculty for this CME activity and the CME Institute staff were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal and financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships. Faculty financial disclosures are as follows:

Dr Benca is a consultant for Merck and Janssen, and has received grant/research support from Merck and the National Institutes of Health. Dr Buysse is a consultant for Bayer, BeHealth Solutions, Cereve, CME Outfitters, Emmi Solutions, Medscape, Merck, and Purdue; has received grant/research support from the National Institutes of Health; and has received royalties for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI).

Objectives

After participating in these activities, you should be able to:

  • Consider whether patients with psychiatric disorders and sleep symptoms have a comorbid insomnia disorder
  • Tailor insomnia treatment for patients with psychiatric disorders by considering cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia as well as drug mechanisms of action in relation to specific symptoms

 

Ruth M. Benca, MD, PhD (Chair)

Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine

Daniel J. Buysse, MD

Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania

CME Background Information

Assessing and Treating Insomnia in Patients With Psychiatric Disorders, Part 1

Supported by an educational grant from Merck & Co., Inc.

Participants may receive credit by listening to the activity, correctly answering the posttest question, and completing the evaluation.

Objective

After completing this educational activity, you should be able to:

  • Consider whether patients with psychiatric disorders and sleep symptoms have a comorbid insomnia disorder
  • Tailor insomnia treatment for patients with psychiatric disorders by considering cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia as well as drug mechanisms of action in relation to specific symptoms

Financial Disclosure

The faculty for this CME activity and the CME Institute staff were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal and financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships. Faculty financial disclosures are as follows:

Dr Benca is a consultant for Merck and Janssen and has received grant/research support from Merck and the National Institutes of Health. Dr Buysse is a consultant for Bayer, BeHealth Solutions, Cereve, CME Outfitters, Emmi Solutions, Medscape, Merck, and Purdue, and has received grant/research support from the National Institutes of Health.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

To obtain credit for this activity, study the material and complete the CME Posttest and Evaluation.

Release, Review, and Expiration Dates

This Podcast activity was published in November 2017 and is eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through November 30, 2019. The latest review of this material was November 2017.

Statement of Need and Purpose

Insomnia is a common feature of many psychiatric disorders but can also be a comorbid disorder. In either manifestation, insomnia can lead to poorer outcomes, but many psychiatrists often fail to recognize the extent and severity of sleep difficulties in their patients. Many patients with psychiatric disorders continue to experience insomnia after the symptoms of their psychiatric disorders have remitted, indicating they are not receiving adequate treatment for their sleep difficulties. Making insomnia a treatment priority can improve patients’ quality of life and psychiatric outcomes. Education is needed about insomnia as a risk factor for psychiatric relapse and poor outcomes. Psychiatrists also need education on available behavioral and pharmacologic insomnia treatments, their mechanisms of action, and their safety and efficacy in different psychiatric disorders.

Disclosure of Off-Label Usage

Dr Benca has determined that, to the best of her knowledge, trazodone is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of insomnia and melatonin is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Review Process

The entire faculty of the series discussed the content at a peer-reviewed planning session, the Chair reviewed the activity for accuracy and fair balance, and a member of the External Advisory CME Board who is without conflict of interest reviewed the activity to determine whether the material is evidence-based and objective.

Acknowledgment

This Podcast is derived from the planning teleconference series “Reconsidering Insomnia as a Disorder Rather Than Just a Symptom in Psychiatric Practice,” which was held in August and September 2017, and supported by an educational grant from Merck & Co., Inc. The opinions expressed herein are those of the faculty and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the CME provider and publisher or the commercial supporter.

CME Background Information

Assessing and Treating Insomnia in Patients With Psychiatric Disorders, Part 2

Supported by an educational grant from Merck & Co., Inc.

Participants may receive credit by listening to the activity, correctly answering the posttest question, and completing the evaluation.

Objective

After completing this educational activity, you should be able to:

  • Consider whether patients with psychiatric disorders and sleep symptoms have a comorbid insomnia disorder
  • Tailor insomnia treatment for patients with psychiatric disorders by considering cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia as well as drug mechanisms of action in relation to specific symptoms

Financial Disclosure

The faculty for this CME activity and the CME Institute staff were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal and financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships. Faculty financial disclosures are as follows:

Dr Benca is a consultant for Merck and Janssen and has received grant/research support from Merck and the National Institutes of Health. Dr Buysse is a consultant for Bayer, BeHealth Solutions, Cereve, CME Outfitters, Emmi Solutions, Medscape, Merck, and Purdue, and has received grant/research support from the National Institutes of Health.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

To obtain credit for this activity, study the material and complete the CME Posttest and Evaluation.

Release, Review, and Expiration Dates

This Podcast activity was published in November 2017 and is eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through November 30, 2019. The latest review of this material was November 2017.

Statement of Need and Purpose

Insomnia is a common feature of many psychiatric disorders but can also be a comorbid disorder. In either manifestation, insomnia can lead to poorer outcomes, but many psychiatrists often fail to recognize the extent and severity of sleep difficulties in their patients. Many patients with psychiatric disorders continue to experience insomnia after the symptoms of their psychiatric disorders have remitted, indicating they are not receiving adequate treatment for their sleep difficulties. Making insomnia a treatment priority can improve patients’ quality of life and psychiatric outcomes. Education is needed about insomnia as a risk factor for psychiatric relapse and poor outcomes. Psychiatrists also need education on available behavioral and pharmacologic insomnia treatments, their mechanisms of action, and their safety and efficacy in different psychiatric disorders.

Disclosure of Off-Label Usage

Dr Benca has determined that, to the best of her knowledge, gabapentin, mirtazapine, quetiapine, and trazodone are not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of insomnia.

Review Process

The entire faculty of the series discussed the content at a peer-reviewed planning session, the Chair reviewed the activity for accuracy and fair balance, and a member of the External Advisory CME Board who is without conflict of interest reviewed the activity to determine whether the material is evidence-based and objective.

Acknowledgment

This Podcast is derived from the planning teleconference series “Reconsidering Insomnia as a Disorder Rather Than Just a Symptom in Psychiatric Practice,” which was held in August and September 2017, and supported by an educational grant from Merck & Co., Inc. The opinions expressed herein are those of the faculty and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the CME provider and publisher or the commercial supporter.